Nomad Stool

The not-so-modest stool

The wooden stool is one of the oldest and most useful types of furniture. Excavations of ancient Egyptian tombs have uncovered preserved wooden stools of various forms made with many species of wood and different ornamentation. As most ancient Egyptians sat on the floor, the pharaohs had stools crafted with elaborate detail to signify their power and status. Imagery of Egypt's enemies were painted on the pharaoh's footstool so that, in symbolic gesture of power, he may tread on his enemies. A stool in the home of ordinary folk was used only by the head of the household and by honoured guests. 

As knowledge of craftsmanship developed, new forms, therefore new functions, became possible. For example, the folding stool, made from two sets of pivoting legs, joined by cross members and held fast with a seat made from stretched animal skin was developed to be easily carried in the field by army commanders. The simple yet effective leg structure became the basis for numerous subsequent designs for stools and chairs.  

Throughout the ages, the wooden stool has signified wealth, status and class. It has been decorated with ebony, ivory, gold and bronze, and its legs have been sculpted to depict lion's heads and paws. Its seat has been sprung, webbed, woven, stretched, and upholstered and stuffed with horse hair, leaves and wool. Cultural traditions and myths have provided the sources of inspiration for complex ornamentation, and for its many forms and functions. For a small object, it has carried a lot of history.

Despite this rich history, the stool has become relatively ordinary, even meek. Once austerity built beauty and meaning into the stool, now with modern abundance it is meaningless. It shouts out loud with a cacophony of colour, material and form, but it has nothing to say.   

This unique stool crafted by Lasse Kinnunen is made using jarrah, stainless steel and upholstered with Elmogrand aniline leather. One of a kind. In an effort to be meaningful. 

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